The Skipjack Tuna Fishery is split into east and west sectors and has been managed by limiting the number of boats that can fish.

There are no boats currently fishing in this fishery and the management arrangements are under review.

Target species

Skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis)


Skipjack tuna (Western and Central Pacific Ocean)
Sustainable
Skipjack tuna (Indian Ocean)
Sustainable

About the fishery


Catch allowance

There are 19 Eastern Skipjack Tuna Fishery permits and 14 Western Skipjack Tuna Fishery permits, however no Australian boats are currently fishing for skipjack tuna. The catch of skipjack tuna has previously been managed by limiting the number of boats that can fish.

Total fishery value

While this fishery is not currently active, the total annual value varied in previous years from $0 to $8.1 million.

Fishing gear

Purse seine fishing gear is used in this fishery.

Read more about purse seine fishing.

Location

The Skipjack Tuna Fishery covers the entire sea area around Australia, out to 200 nm from the coast. It is split into two sectors: the Eastern Skipjack Tuna Fishery and the Western Skipjack Tuna Fishery.

Major landing ports

  • Eden.

Markets supplied

Skipjack tuna in Australia was historically supplied to the cannery in Port Lincoln, however this cannery closed down in 2010.

Fishing season

The Skipjack Tuna Fishery is not currently active and the management arrangements for this fishery are under review.

Management of catch

The Skipjack Tuna Fishery is not currently active and no Australian boats have fished for skipjack tuna since 2009. In the past, the Australian catch of skipjack tuna has been managed by limiting the numbers of boats that can fish. The Skipjack Tuna Fishery Harvest Strategy was previously used to help manage skipjack tuna catch.

The management arrangements for this fishery will be reviewed if active boats re-enter the fishery. For information on past management of the Skipjack Tuna Fishery, please see the Skipjack Tuna Fishery Management Arrangements.

International management

Skipjack tuna is highly migratory, meaning that they swim over large distances and between different countries. For this reason, this species is currently managed internationally.

The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission and the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission are each made up of a large number of member countries, of which Australia is a leader. These Commissions meet every year and review the catch, effort and scientific information for all countries that are members and discusses rules or management techniques to restrict catch or fishing effort across the Western and Central Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean. AFMA has to consider any rules or management by the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission and the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission when managing the Skipjack Tuna Fishery.

Maps

The Skipjack Tuna Fishery is split into two sectors; east and west. The maps below show the sea area that is included in the Eastern Skipjack Tuna Fishery and the Western Skipjack Tuna Fishery.

Map of the Eastern Skipjack Tuna Fishery.

Map of the Eastern Skipjack Tuna Fishery.

Map of the Western Skipjack Tuna Fishery.

Map of the Western Skipjack Tuna Fishery.