Part 4

Accountability and management

Highlights

Part 4

This image show the highlight of the organisation

Organisational structure

Figure 02: Organisational structure

Minister for Agriculture

Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Agriculture

AFMA Commission

AFMA CEO
Dr. James Findlay

Fisheries Management Branch

Executive Manager
Dr. Nick Rayns

Fisheries Operations Branch

General Manager
Mr. Peter Venslovas

Corporate Services Branch

General Manager
Mr. Peter Tegart

Northern Fisheries

Senior Manager
Mr. Steve Bolton

National Compliance Strategy

Senior Manager
Mr. Tod Spencer

Communications and Executive Secretariat

Senior Manager
Mr. Andrew Pearson

Demersal and Midwater Fisheries

Senior Manager
Mr. George Day

Compliance Operations (Darwin)

Senior Manager
Mr. John Davis

Business

Chief Finance Office
Mr. Robert Gehrig

Tuna and International Fisheries

Senior Manager
Mr. Trent Timmiss

Foreign Compliance Policy

Senior Manager
Ms. Kerry Smith

Legal

Senior Manager
Mr. Paul Halliday

Policy, Environment, Economics, Co—management and Research

Senior Manager
Ms. Beth Gibson

Compliance Operations (Canberra)

Senior Manager
Mr. John Andersen

Workplace

Senior Manager
Ms. Libby Jenkins

Service One

Senior Manager
A/g Mr. Phil Ravanello

Projects

Senior Manager
Mr. John Kozman

Business Improvement and
External Services

Senior Manager
Mr. Ryan Murphy

Service Group

Senior Manager
Mr. Jeremy Richter

AFMA Liaison Officer

South East Trawl Fishing Industry Association (SETFIA) Mr. Andrew Trappett

AFMA Liaison Officer Australian Recreational Fishing Foundation (ARFF)

Mr. Patrick Sachs

Where we operate

AFMA has offices in three locations, Canberra, Darwin and Thursday Island. The largest of these is our Canberra office which, as at 30 June 2015, employed 126 people, managing most of AFMA's functions including fisheries management, licensing, environment and research, national compliance operations, foreign compliance policy, and corporate services.

The Darwin office employed 34 staff as at 30 June 2015, with a focus on our foreign compliance and international engagement functions.

The Thursday Island office manages the Torres Strait Fisheries and employed six staff as at 30 June 2015.

We also employed 20 casual field observers who undertake duties on commercial fishing vessels around Australia.

AFMA office locations

Canberra office

Street address

Postal address

Enquiries

Level 6

73 Northbourne Ave

CANBERRA ACT 2600

PO BOX 7051

Canberra Business Centre

CANBERRA ACT 2610

Ph: (02) 6225 5555

Fax: (02) 6225 5500

AFMA Direct: 1300 723 621

Darwin office

Street address

Postal address

Enquiries

Level 6

NT House

22 Mitchell Street

DARWIN NT 0800

GPO Box 131

DARWIN NT 0801

Ph: (08) 8943 0333

Fax: (08) 8942 2897

Thursday Island office

Street address

Postal address

Enquiries

Level 2

Pearls Building

38 Victoria Parade

THURSDAY ISLAND QLD 4875

PO Box 376

THURSDAY ISLAND QLD 4875

Ph: (07) 4069 1990

Fax: (07) 4069 1277

Corporate governance practices

Governing body

As provided in the Fisheries Administration Act 1991, AFMA was established to manage Commonwealth fisheries. During the reporting period the Authority was a body corporate which could sue and be sued. However the Authority could not hold money and all financial liabilities are taken to be liabilities of the Commonwealth.

AFMA's domestic fisheries management functions and powers are the responsibility of the Commission. The CEO is responsible for assisting the Commission, including giving effect to its decisions.

The CEO is separately responsible for exercising the Authority's foreign compliance functions and powers, and the Chief Executive's responsibilities under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and the Public Service Act 1999. The CEO and staff constitute a Statutory Agency under the Public Service Act 1999.

The Minister for Agriculture appoints the chairman, part—time commissioners and the CEO. Following advice from the chairman, the minister appoints a part—time commissioner as deputy—chairperson.

The AFMA Commission is subject to limited government policy direction as stated in section  91 of the Fisheries Administration Act 1991. The minister is the approving authority for AFMA's Corporate Plan, Annual Operational Plan and all fishery management plans determined by AFMA.

The CEO is subject to Ministerial Direction with regard to the Authority's foreign compliance functions, and under the Public Service Act 1999 is required to be responsive to government in implementing the government's policies and programs.

For more information about AFMA's Commissioners and fisheries management advisory committees, see our agency on page 198.

Conflicts of interest

Commissioners must disclose to the Minister any pecuniary or other interest that may relate to their AFMA functions, both prior to appointment and if such interests arise during their terms of office. Disclosures of interests are kept on a register of interests held by AFMA and a commissioner must not take part in any deliberation or decision in which he/she has such an interest.

Performance review

The AFMA Commission reviews its performance at each commission meeting. Matters reviewed may include its success in pursuing AFMA's objectives, strategic direction and committee effectiveness.

Corporate and operational planning and review

AFMA's Planning and Reporting Framework consists of obligations under the Fisheries Administration Act 1991, whole—of—government requirements, and internal documents we produce for the purpose of good governance. The key elements are:

Corporate Plan

This plan identifies factors in AFMA's operating environment that may affect our operations, and sets out our principal goals for the next four years. The plan also outlines the strategies we will use to pursue those goals and key performance indicators for measuring our performance. We have reported against the key result areas identified in our Corporate Plan 2014–17 on pages 17 to 59.

Annual Operational Plan

This plan covers 12 months and gives details of the strategies identified and to be applied in relation to meeting relevant corporate plan goals. We have reported against the key performance indicators described in our Annual Operational Plan 2014–15 on pages 17 to 59.

Portfolio Budget Statements

AFMA contributes to the Department of Agriculture's Portfolio Budget Statements. The purpose of the Portfolio Budget Statements is to inform senators and members of Parliament of the proposed allocation of resources to government outcomes. Within this document, we set out our broad strategic direction, budget estimates against specific outputs, and key performance indicators.

Internal reporting

Each quarter, we report to our CEO and Commission against our goals and strategies, key result areas and key performance indicators identified in our corporate and annual operational plans. This ensures that progress is on track, and simplifies the process of annual reporting.

Annual Report

The annual report provides information on AFMA's operations and performance, including reporting against the measures set out in the Corporate Plan, Annual Operational Plan and Portfolio Budget Statements.

The system of corporate plans and performance reporting is under review in accord with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

Internal scrutiny

Risk management

AFMA's corporate risk management procedures have been in place since 2008 and its processes are imbedded in our planning, project management and fraud control procedures. AFMA's Risk Management Framework and Risk Register are each reviewed annually, and in 2015 a comprehensive review of overall risk management practices was undertaken.

The review found that while AFMA has robust risk management processes in place, the introduction of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 has resulted in some of these processes being redundant. Further work will be undertaken in 2015–16 to align our risk management processes with the Act and the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy.

The risk management process is monitored by AFMA's Audit and Risk Committee, while AFMA Commission meetings consider significant and current issues that potentially affect our operations or reputation, and advice from the Audit and Risk Committee.

Business continuity

AFMA's business continuity plan identifies essential business activities and provides guidance in establishing alternative arrangements in the event of unexpected disruption to normal service delivery. The plan enables the priority allocation of resources to critical business processes to ensure that we continue to function effectively following a disaster. The plan includes cyclone response procedures for our Darwin and Thursday Island offices, information and communications technology disaster recovery and AFMA's Pandemic Plan.

The plan was established in 2010 and is tested and updated annually, with the Audit and Risk Committee monitoring this. The annual test was conducted in August 2014 and identified several areas for enhancement including confirmation of emergency office accommodation arrangements and updates to legislation and important contacts in the plan. No event occurred within the reporting period that activated the plan.

Fraud control

The Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework 2014 requires us to review fraud control planning every two years. In accordance with this, in 2014 we established AFMA's Fraud Control Plan 2014–2016. This plan incorporates information relating to our approach to fraud control, the fraud risk assessment and strategies for fraud minimisation arising from risk treatment recommendations.

We investigated 82 new external fraud related matters during the 2014–15 period primarily associated with breaches of the domestic quota management arrangements. An additional 32 external fraud matters were carried over from the previous year.

AFMA finalised 89 external fraud matters as a result of instituting either administrative or prosecution action. There are still 25 matters currently under investigation, referred to the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions, in court or otherwise in the process of finalisation.

Additionally there were eight foreign matters involving six apprehensions and two legislative forfeitures16 in 2014–15.

Our Audit and Risk Committee monitors the status of the plan and its recommendations.

Audit and Risk Committee

AFMA's Audit and Risk Committee provides independent assurance and assistance to the Chief Executive Officer and the AFMA Commission on AFMA's Risk, Control and Compliance Framework, Performance Framework and its external accountability responsibilities.

For further information on the Audit and Risk Committee see page 201.

External scrutiny

AFMA's financial statements are audited annually by the Australian National Audit Office. The Australian National Audit Office examines the strength of our internal controls to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the annual financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement.

The Audit Office obtains and updates its understanding of AFMA, the environment in which it operates, its objectives and strategies and internal controls. This includes obtaining an understanding of the information systems and related business processes relevant to our financial reporting objectives (including the accounting system) and how we have responded to any related financial reporting risks. Relevant Australian National Audit Office performance audits or internal audit activity are considered as part of this process.

Our performance is also subject to review through Senate Estimates.

In addition, we engage an independent internal auditor to undertake audits of business programs and controls, identified in the biennial Assurance Map and Controls Framework Review. During 2014–15, two of the planned audits from the original plan were completed as follows:

  • Review of fee for service arrangements
  • Stakeholder engagement and the role of key committees.

The objective of the audits is to review and update the existing Assurance Map and Control Framework to:

  • Provide the AFMA Audit and Risk Committee with an up—to—date assessment of the key business processes, risks and assurance activities along with the existing control framework.
  • Assess the appropriateness of the overall assurance framework and inform the development of the strategic internal audit work program.
  • Assess the appropriateness of assurance measures implemented since the last Assurance Map Report and Control Framework Review.
  • Identify gaps in the existing control framework and identify suggested areas for improvement.
  • Inform development of the next internal audit program.

Outcomes of judicial and administrative tribunals are referenced at Appendix 2: “Civil Litigation Outcomes” on page 204.

Stakeholder satisfaction

Our stakeholders

AFMA engages with a wide variety of stakeholders before making decisions on the management of Commonwealth fisheries, including scientists, commercial fishers and fishing associations, researchers, environment and conservation organisations, recreational fishers and Indigenous fishers.

We do this through a variety of channels, including:

  • management advisory committees
  • resource assessment groups
  • port visits
  • our website
  • news stories
  • media releases
  • direct mail across all major Commonwealth fisheries.

These mechanisms provide an important avenue for us to have open dialogue with those with an interest in the management of Commonwealth fisheries.

Communication channels

The Fisheries Management Act 1991 contains specific provisions on the communication and consultation processes and channels for communicating information about regulation.

AFMA communicates formally in writing via GoFish with all Commonwealth fishing concession holders regarding regulation of their access to Commonwealth fisheries.

In addition to statutory processes, we consult extensively with stakeholders on management issues. The main point of contact with stakeholders is through the statutory management advisory committees for each of the major fisheries and the non—statutory resource assessment groups. There is more information on the committees on page 205 to 207.

Stakeholders are regularly updated about changes to regulations, Commission decisions and other changes via our website, news stories and media releases. Interested stakeholders can register to directly receive AFMA News on a daily, weekly or monthly basis.

We completed a significant redesign of our website in January 2015 to improve accessibility and navigability for the community and stakeholders. In the six months since its launch, numbers of subscribers to AFMA's website increased by nearly 9 per cent.

Media releases are used as a channel to distribute information to the broader community on a variety of topics to promote not only the work of AFMA, but notify of domestic and international compliance activity, and highlight the link between sustainable fisheries and a healthy supply of Australian seafood.

SMS messaging has also been introduced as part of monthly targeted campaigns to alert concession holders and skippers of AFMA changes and monthly compliance targets.

We also convey information about regulations during port visits and at public meetings. Open port meetings occur regularly in fisheries to discuss proposed new management arrangements.

We also have the ability to use integrated computer vessel monitoring systems, a satellite based system, to communicate with fishing vessels via text message/email anywhere in the world.

Management advisory committees

Management advisory committees and resource advisory groups are a major source of advice to AFMA, reflecting the experience and expertise of the range of stakeholders with interest in the fishery or fisheries.

Management advisory committees play a vital role in helping AFMA fulfil its legislative functions and effectively pursue its objectives by acting as the main advisory body and link between AFMA and those with an interest in the fishery.

Each committee has an independent chair, an AFMA member and a maximum of seven other members. Generally, membership is drawn from industry, policy, research, conservation, state and territory governments, recreational fishing and research fields but it can included broader community members who have relevant skills and expertise including traditional fishers, where appropriate.

In 2014–15 there were seven management advisory committees covering tunas, northern prawns, sub—Antarctic fisheries, scallops, and scalefish, shark and squid fisheries in southern and eastern areas of Australia.

Client service charter

AFMA's Client Service Charter sets out the services and standards that all clients or stakeholders can expect from us. It applies to all of our fisheries administration and corporate services functions, including our licensing function. Our service charter is available on our website.

We have performed well against the customer service standards in our service charter and continue to streamline processes to improve customer service.

In 2014–15, our online licensing and quota management portal, GoFish, continued to assist in improving the timeliness of responses for licensing transactions. Around 89 per cent of fishing transactions that can be completed online were completed through GoFish during 2014–15. There were in excess of 4500 individual transactions conducted using GoFish, an increase of more than 2300 transactions from the previous year. This increase in transactions reflects the number of additional functions that can be performed in GoFish such as the development of a simplified one step process for leasing of concessions, which has further reduced the regulatory burden on industry.

Of the licensing transactions completed manually, 98 per cent were within the timeframes provided in the client service charter. This figure relates to manual transactions submitted by concession holders and responses to correspondence and information requests.

During 2014–2015 AFMA received one written complaint that was responded to in writing in line with the requirements of the service charter.

Measuring stakeholder satisfaction

As part of AFMA's focus on improving its regulatory performance, a performance audit of the effectiveness and adequacy of our community and stakeholder engagement activities with key external stakeholders and committees commenced in April 2015. The audit, which will continue in 2015–16, is being undertaken by Oakton Consulting Technology (AFMA's internal audit providers).

AFMA Fisheries staff

People management

Our staff

At 30 June 2015, AFMA employed 197 staff (174 ongoing, 23 non—ongoing). The majority of our staff were located in the Canberra office, with 34 staff located in the Darwin office, six on Thursday Island, and 20 casual field observers undertaking duties on commercial fishing vessels around Australia. The total of 197 also included 11 employees on long—term leave.

AFMA's employment profile has not changed significantly from 2013–14. The proportion of part—time staff has decreased slightly to 11.6 per cent in 2014–15 from 12 per cent in 2013–14.

The proportion of females has remained the same at 34 per cent as in 2014–15. The percentage of women at EL1–2 levels for 2014–2015 has slightly decreased to 25 per cent from 26 per cent the previous year.

There has been a slight decrease in the number of staff from non—English speaking backgrounds with a reduction to four staff in 2014–15 from five in 2013–14.

The number of staff whose parents come from a non—English speaking background has seen an increased from 14 to 24. This is increase is most likely due to improved reporting capability within AFMA's Human Resource Management System.

The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff members has slightly decreased from six to five while the number of employees who identified themselves as having a disability has remained the same at four.

Table 05: Equal opportunity profile of AFMA staff as at June 30 2015

Level

NESB1

NESB2

People with disability

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Women

Men

Total staff at level

APS 2–4

0

5

1

4

24

42

66

APS 5–6

4

12

2

0

30

45

75

EL1

1

5

0

1

9

26

35

EL2

0

1

1

0

4

14

18

SES

0

1

0

0

0

3

3

Total

5

24

4

5

67

130

197

NESB1: Persons from a non—English speaking background who were born overseas.

NESB2: Persons whose parent/s are from a non—English speaking background.

Table 06: Non—ongoing staff employed by location, gender and employment status as at June 30 2015

Level

Location

Female

Male

Total staff at level

Part time

Full time

Part time

Full time

APS 1–2

Canberra

0

0

15

0

15

Darwin

0

0

0

0

0

Thursday Island

0

0

0

0

0

APS 3–4

Canberra

0

1

5

1

7

Darwin

0

0

0

0

0

Thursday Island

0

0

0

0

0

APS 5–6

Canberra

0

0

0

0

0

Darwin

0

0

0

0

0

Thursday Island

0

0

0

0

0

EL1

Canberra

0

0

0

0

0

Darwin

0

0

0

0

0

Thursday Island

0

0

0

0

0

EL2

Canberra

0

0

0

1

1

Darwin

0

0

0

0

0

Thursday Island

0

0

0

0

0

SES

Canberra

0

0

0

0

0

Darwin

0

0

0

0

0

Thursday Island

0

0

0

0

0

Total

0

1

20

2

23

*These figures include 20 observers who are engaged as intermittent/irregular casual) employees, included in Canberra Figures.

Table 07: Ongoing staff employed by location, gender and employment status as at June 30 2015

Level

Location

Female

Male

Total staff at level

Part time

Full time

Part time

Full time

APS 1–2

Canberra

1

1

0

0

2

Darwin

1

0

0

1

2

Thursday Island

0

0

0

0

0

APS 3–4

Canberra

4

10

0

14

28

Darwin

0

4

0

5

9

Thursday Island

0

2

0

1

3

APS 5–6

Canberra

11

16

4

26

57

Darwin

0

3

0

14

17

Thursday Island

0

0

0

1

1

EL1

Canberra

1

7

1

21

30

Darwin

0

1

0

3

4

Thursday Island

0

0

0

1

1

EL2

Canberra

0

3

0

12

15

Darwin

0

0

0

1

1

Thursday Island

0

1

0

0

1

SES

Canberra

0

0

0

2

2

Darwin

0

0

0

1

1

Thursday Island

0

0

0

0

0

Total

18

48

5

103

174

This table includes 11 staff on long—term leave. It does not include the four AFMA employees on temporary transfer to other Australian Public Service agencies. These figures relate to the nominal occupants of the position and not employees who may be acting as at 30 June 2015. This SES figure also includes AFMA's Chief Executive Officer.

Our human resource management

In May 2015, AFMA staff participated in the Australian Public Service Employee Census. For the 2015 Census, we again nominated to include an additional 10 questions directly related to AFMA. These questions focussed on organisational effectiveness, stakeholder engagement, performance management and recruitment and selection. To achieve a temporal comparison for change, the same 10 agency specific questions were used in the 2013 and the 2014 Census. The questions were developed in consultation with our executive and People Initiatives Committee. The results, due later in 2015, will be used to assist us in managing our workforce and to see how we compare to both other regulatory agencies and the APS as a whole.

In July 2014 the Human Resources section launched the implementation of new online modules in relation to our human resource self—service management system Kiosk. This saw the automation of human resources functions including learning and development, work health and safety reporting and performance management. These modules have provided significant improvement to the capability of the self—service elements of Kiosk and allow for more effective management of our people and capabilities.

We have a number of programs to acknowledge high performing employees through our Rewards and Recognition Scheme. Each year we offer staff the opportunity to nominate for the annual development award. The intention of the award is to recognise and reward performance on the part of the individual whilst providing an opportunity for personal development that ultimately benefits both the individual and AFMA.

The annual AFMA Achievement Awards were presented in February 2015 to the team/s and the individual/s that had made a significant contribution during 2014. These awards are nominated by staff and assessed by the Executive. There are two categories individual and team.

The 2014 Individual Achievement Award was presented to Mr. Shane Fava, Manager, Torres Strait Fisheries, based on Thursday Island. Shane demonstrated strong, high level leadership and management of his team and in representing AFMA. He was instrumental in ensuring his team on Thursday Island continued to build AFMA's reputation for fisheries management service delivery. With Shane's leadership, AFMA's relationship with Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people was strengthened and is testament to the hard work and commitment of both himself and his team. As a result of this, a high level of respect developed among communities, fishers, fisheries organisations, Native Title representatives and government bodies.

The 2014 Team Achievement Award was presented to the Seabird Threat Abatement Plan and Gillnet, Hook and Trap Seabird Response Team comprising David Power, Josh Cahill, Trent Timmiss, Mike Gerner and Paul Ryan. This cross— sectional seabird specialist team was able to strategically direct the approach used in the new Seabird Threat Abatement Plan to allow for an individual responsibility approach to management. The team worked closely with stakeholders and held industry workshops that were also attended by staff from the Australian Antarctic Division. The work done by this team resulted in improved management arrangements in addition to continued fishing activity. This photo shows the AFMA management team

From left to right: Mr Paul Ryan, Mr Trent Timmiss, Dr James Findlay (CEO), Mr David Power, Mr Mike Gerner, Mr Joshua Cahill.

Our terms and conditions of employment

The conditions of employment for all AFMA staff, except Senior Executive Service (SES), are covered by AFMA's Enterprise Agreement 2011 (the EA) and associated policies. AFMA's current Enterprise Agreement has a nominal expiry date of 30 June 2014 and outlines a broad range of matters such as:

  • rates of pay
  • employment conditions, e.g. hours of work, meal breaks, overtime
  • consultative mechanisms
  • dispute resolution procedures.

A new Enterprise Agreement is being negotiated in accordance with the Australian Government Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy announced by the Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for the Public Service, Senator the Hon. Eric Abetz on 28 March 2014.

The Agency Head and employees covered by the Enterprise Agreement may agree to make an individual flexibility agreement to vary the effect of terms of the Agreement if the arrangement deals with one or more of the following matters:

  • arrangements about when work is performed
  • overtime rates
  • penalty rates
  • allowances
  • remuneration
  • leave and the arrangement meets the genuine needs of the Agency and employee.

AFMA made 45 Individual Flexibility Agreements for 39 staff during 2014–2015. The number of agreements is higher than the number of staff outlined in the table below.  This is due to five staff having more than one agreement approved within the financial year.  The details of the agreements made in 2014–2015 are shown in the below table.

Table 08: Number of staff with Individual Flexibility Agreements 2014–2015

Classification

Number

APS 1

0

APS 2

2

APS 3

0

APS 4

6

APS 5

3

APS 6

17

EL1

13

EL2

4

Remuneration

AFMA's salary ranges are contained in AFMA's Enterprise Agreement 2011. The salary minimum and maximum amounts at each classification as at 30 June 2015 are shown in the below table:

Table 09: Enterprise agreement salary ranges as at 30 June 2015

Classification

Minimum

Maximum

APS 1

$37,827

$48,278

APS 2

$51,759

$55,245

APS 3

$56,656

$61,574

APS 4

$64,032

$68,460

APS 5

$70,568

$74,741

APS 6

$78,912

$87,263

EL1

$97,073

$107,891

EL2

$113,887

$132,775

In accordance with AFMA's Enterprise Agreement 2011, the Agency Head may approve additional salary of up to 20 per cent.

AFMA does not have performance bonuses.

AFMA's salary ranges for Senior Executive Service staff are contained in AFMA's Executive Remuneration Policy. The salary amounts as at 30 June 2015 are shown in the below table.

Table 10: AFMA Senior Executive Remuneration Policy salary ranges as at 30 June 2015

Classification

Minimum

Maximum

SES Band 1

$162,283

$183,762

SES Band 2

$205,632

$227,970

The remuneration of Senior Executives is determined with reference to the remuneration survey published by the Australian Public Service Commission and is commensurate with the assessed complexity of their work. Senior Executives are not eligible for a bonus amount after a performance assessment by the Chief Executive Officer. In addition to the salary ranges above, and as part of their total remuneration package, Senior Executive officers are also eligible to access additional provisions including salary in lieu of a vehicle and car parking. Due to the small numbers of Senior Executives within AFMA, further breakdown of Senior Executive remuneration packages are not made available to avoid identification of individuals.

Remuneration for the Chief Executive Officer is determined by the Remuneration Tribunal. Details are available from the Remuneration Tribunal website.

AFMA did not generally make use of any non—salary benefits in 2014–15.

Training and development

AFMA continued to offer a wide range of training and development opportunities to ensure we have a capable workforce. In 2014–15 we had a particular focus on training in the following courses:

  • Inappropriate Workplace Conduct
  • Bullying and Harassment
  • Harassment Contact Officer Training
  • The New Supervisor
  • Report Writing and Writing skills
  • Project Management
  • Working smart using Microsoft Outlook
  • Time Management
  • Sea Safety
  • First Aid
  • Defence Tactics refresher training
  • Certificate of Safety training
  • Protective Security training.

Training needs are identified by individual Performance Capability Plans which highlight both essential and desirable training for each staff member. The training identified in the plans is compiled to assess agency training requirements. Individuals can also self—nominate or be nominated by a manager for any specific training. This system has worked well for us in determining training priorities and ensuring individuals are given opportunities they require for their roles and responsibilities and for self—development.

Sea Safety Training Opt

Bullying and harassment training

In 2014–15, AFMA was committed to implementing a bullying and harassment program for all staff. In a commitment to ensuring that our staff were adequately informed about the impacts of workplace bullying and harassment, we have a Bullying and Harassment Online Training Module available to all staff. The aim of this program is to raise awareness and to build an understanding to prevent and respond to workplace bullying and harassment. In addition to this online program, Comcare facilitated a training session called Inappropriate Workplace Conduct which was delivered to managers. This training was designed to assist managers to recognise the early warning signs and symptoms in workers and others which result from inappropriate workplace conduct and to identify early intervention strategies through the risk management process and by following the issue resolution procedure.

AFMA's Harassment Contact Officers were provided with specific training in order to effectively fulfil their roles. This training enables AFMA's Harassment Contact Officers to provide support and assistance to employees in relation to harassment issues.

Risk—based regulation workshop

AFMA hosted the internationally renowned Professor Malcom Sparrow, who conducted a workshop on risk—based regulation. Professor Sparrow led a high—level discussion on the recent developments in the regulation and reforms in the context of the deregulation environments. Topics included performance management and measurement in risk control setting, reform implementation, challenges and opportunities, special categories of risk and implications for effective control. The workshop was attended by AFMA staff and representatives from other Australian Public Service agencies.

New supervisor training

This course was offered to those staff who were either first—time managers or staff wanting to increase their skills and potential for future leadership roles by identifying and exploring common challenges faced by new supervisors. The training provided information about the necessary skills to become a highly capable and successful team leader. It focused on identifying individual strengths and developing effectiveness in communicating with others. It also provided information about building credibility and trust while cultivating positive workplace relationships. Participants learning how to direct and motivate teams to achieve operational outcomes, how to monitor performance and respond to changing circumstances.

Study assistance program

We continued to support employees to gain relevant tertiary qualifications to expand individual and organisation capabilities. The program assists employees to pursue studies that are directly related to AFMA's business (including assistance in the form of funding and/or study leave). In 2014–2015, eight employees were granted assistance for studies in various areas including Environmental Science, Project Management, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Applied Science (Fisheries Management), Policing (Investigations), Commerce, Research and Analytical Skills and Bookkeeping qualifications.

Purchasing and asset management

Purchasing

During 2014–15 purchasing activities have been undertaken across each branch in accordance with the Accountable Authority Instructions and related Procurement Rules.

The Procurement Rules specify two thresholds amounts:

  • Major procurements with a threshold of $80 000 in value must be undertaken through a request for tender unless there is a specific exemption.
  • Procurements under $80 000 must be undertaken in accordance with the minimum quotation and documentation rules set out within the Accountable Authority Instructions and Procurement Rules as they apply to the value and risk of a proposed procurement.

In some cases, major procurements were undertaken using coordinated procurement arrangements established by other Commonwealth agencies.

Asset management

During 2014–15 AFMA managed its assets in accordance with the relevant requirements of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, the Accountable Authority Instructions and the Australian Accounting Standards.

Departmental assets total $23.418 million and this includes, cash, receivables, land, buildings, property, plant and equipment, intangibles and other assets. Administered assets total $0.278 million and this includes cash and receivables.

AFMA maintains an asset register in its financial management system for non—financial assets, including land, buildings, property, plant and equipment, intangibles, with a value greater than $2000. Revaluation of all AFMA asset classes are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets does not differ materially from the assets' fair values. The Chief Finance Officer is responsible for managing and coordinating AFMA's revaluation program.

Contracts

During 2014–15, AFMA entered into contracts with a range of suppliers for the provision of goods and services. AFMA maintains a contracts register within its financial management system for all contracts entered into that are above $10 000 in value. For procurement reporting AFMA:

  • publishes all contracts over $10 000 on the AusTender website
  • publishes a list of all contracts that exceed $100 000 on the on AFMA's internet site twice a year.

During 2014–15, AFMA entered into 50 consultancy contracts with an aggregate value of $6.772 million. This reflected that specialised or professional skills were either not present or available internally or there was a need for an independent third party. Further information on AFMA's consultancy contracts is on the AusTender website tenders.gov.au

Advertising and market research

During 2014–15 AFMA spent $2900 on advertising. This expenditure primarily related to fishery gazettal notices and community notices in the Torres Strait.

Discretionary grants

AFMA does not administer any discretionary grants.

Toothfish Posts Photo of Vessel

16 Legislative forfeiture is where Australia seizes the fishing gear and catch from the offenders and then releases the vessel and crew to return to their origin.